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20121228
20121228
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, partly sunny, 54. st. louis, cloudy, 38, denver, mostly cloudy, 33, seattle, mostly cloudy, 44 degrees. >>> here's another look at this morning's top stories. general norman swargts schwarzkopf died at his home yesterday in tampa, florida. he drove iraqi forces out of kuwait. he died from complications related to pneumonia. he was 78 years old. >>> and president obama meets with congressional leaders this afternoon at the white house to try to cut a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. in just four days across-the-board spending cuts take effect. >>> if president obama and congress fails to reach an agreement the price of milk could lead sharply. perhaps $6 per gallon. at issue is the farm bill and how much the federal government pays farmers. john blackstone reports. >> who wants milk? >> me. >> me. >> me. >> reporter: with four children the rasmussen family in california drinks about five gallons a week on milk. if congress doesn't pass the bill, i would cost him $106. that has dad sean rasmussen worried. >> they have to have their milk. we might have to cut elsewhere. >> report
economic cpr in real life. the ""grey's anatomy" start" trying to rescue a coffee shop chain in seattle. they're hoping to save about 500 jobs. democracy said he within as to give back to the city and play a bigger role in the community. how about that. good for him. >> a lot of competition in seattle for coffee shops. >> that's right. >>> spy games between americans and north koreans and how one move caught the u.s. completely off guard. >>> and the florida teens who took a page out of bruce springste springsteen's play book, taking the stage to help after hurricane sandy. >>> if you're leaving the house, watch us on your desk top or mobile phone, go to cnn.com/tv. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. just like you. we replaced people with a machine.r
is a painkiller. >> what sort of impact have you seen here in seattle? >> if you pull a group of people together from this community, someone in that group is going to have had a friend, a loved one that's either had difficulty with a prescription drug or potentially died from that. >> reporter: the unit responds to 45 calls a month for overdee overdeess. this is important. it can be difficult to tell if it's a painkiller or heroin because they come from the same ingredient and do the same sort of thing to your body. >> aside from needle tracks in the arms, someone who has had an overdose of pain medication like that or heroin, they could look very much the same. >> absolutely. they could be unconscious from a medication that they think is relatively safe for them because instead of getting it on the street, they get it from a pharmacist. >> these people are suffering from chronic pain. they know that a little bit of pain medication helps. so maybe a lot would help a lot more. >> reporter: when we arrive another medic is on the scene. >> somewhere in that parking garage there was a call of someo
in the country. >> we have more pedestrian crashes than cities like chicago, seattle and boston. >> reporter: as chief of surgery at san francisco general hospital, dr. peggy knudson sees pedestrian injuries almost every day. >> you could get hit by a vehicle, you're going to get hurt. if you are an adult, the way that you're struck by cars, you' likely to have pelvic fractures, lower extremity fractures, rib fractures. if you are a child, you're going to get tossed and you're most likely to have a severe head injury. >> reporter: and in san francisco, two pedestrians are hit on average every, single day. with 17 deaths each year costing the public more than $15 million. that's got the attention of mayor ed lee. >> we pick this day and this time and this area here to make this announcement that we have a pedestrian strategy that's going on a serious one. >> reporter: a citywide effort targeting hot spots urging drivers to slow down and pedestrians to pay attention, a challenge when some feel texting is just not that dangerous. >> not if you are with a group of people. >> reporter: dr. kim mu
will continue to see wind and showers from seattle down through san francisco. that's a look at the national weather. we'll get a look at your local forecast after this. >>> if you're not awe fan of cold get out today because today is conditional. we'll see highs in the low to mid 40s with increasing clouds by noontime today. 41. 44 the high and then cooling quickly after 7:00 today as we drop into the 30s. snow starts around 2:00 or 3:00 a.m. and continues until 2:00 or 3:00 p.m. tomorrow and so the storm is in and out with one to two everyones add snow changes to rain and areas of dk off to the south and east, two to three inches of snow expected up to the north. d that's a look at yo weather. d that's a look at yo willie, over to you. >> maria, thanks a lot. later this morning, we're going to take a look back at how we covered the biggest stories of the year. obviously, the tragic school shooting in connecticut is fresh on everybody's minds. what were your biggest stories of the year? >> it feels so obvious, but i think the presidential election has to be on the list. something that we a
you feel hopeless? >> i don't know why, i mean, i should have moved back to seattle, washington to my family. it never entered my mind. i was 29 years old. i had the cutest kids on earth. here's a side story, men would say they like me. i was pretty. you have three children? where do they live? i would say they live with me, you jerk. where do you think they live, they are my children. no, i was always an activist. i was always an activist, always a leader. it never entered my mind that we weren't going to get through this. but i was educated. i had good job skills. i was articulate and you know i had a lot of spine. i wasn't afraid for asking what was due. i was outspoken, that is a better word to say. i was healthy and my children were healthy. a lot of welfare recipients they aren't any of that. i would say to my friends i don't know how these other women do this that don't have the advantages that i have? they would look at me like what do you care about these other women you are struggling. i cared. that's what i brought with me. i was an executive at an electronics company and o
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)